Facebook And Blogging: Why Image Size Matters


Facebook And Blogging - Why Image Size Matters - Aberrant Crochet

It’s been a long week of WordPress, graphics and social media work done for others.  Sometimes that work is more about growth and progress and sometimes it’s more about problem solving.  Lately it’s been an intense mix of both.

One issue that’s been popping up for my clients lately has to do with the images they use in their blog posts and on their websites.  And what happens when they want to share their posts to Facebook.

How sharing with Facebook works:

When you share a link from your blog to Facebook (whether you use an automated tool or you live-share it), the system looks for any image associated with the data at the given link. And it runs through this general process:

  • If you use a “featured image” in your post, that will be what Facebook will look to first.
  • If you don’t have a featured image, it will look for any other image imbedded in your post.
  • If there’s no image in your post, then Facebook will attempt to pull an image from your blog in general.

But all of that goes out the window if your images aren’t at least 200 pixels x 200 pixels in size. 

Size matters when it comes to images. 

It’s not because of impressiveness or simplicity.  Although those details may be end factors.

The #1 reason why your image size matters is because your image must meet a minimum size requirement for Facebook to scrape up and display with your share link on their platform.  All images must meet this minimum requirement, just to be “seen” in the first place.  And 200 pixels x 200 pixels is that minimum necessary size.

There are three main reasons I’ve found as to why this problem pops up frequently:

  • A lot of people get stuck on using thumbnail images for things.  A popular thumbnail size is usually only 150 pixels square, which doesn’t seem all that tiny.  But Facebook won’t pick those up for your share, because they’re not at least 200px.
  • People get confused because Facebook requires your profile image to be 180 pixels x 180 pixels square.  And they think that is the minimum requirement for their shares.  Yeah, sorry.  It’s not big enough.
  • People also get stuck on trying to reduce the size of their images, because they are afraid they might take up too much room.  Chill y’all.  200px square ain’t that big of a file.

So, if you’ve shared your blog posts around the social net, only to wonder why the wrong picture is being grabbed and stuck with your feature?  Look to the size of your image for a solution first.

Hope you find this useful!  Have a good night y’all.

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6 Comments

Filed under NaBloPoMo

6 responses to “Facebook And Blogging: Why Image Size Matters

  1. This IS very useful… Thank you!

  2. If you use Yoast’s WordPress SEO, there will also be a “Social” tab where you can specify a certain image to override what facebook or other social sites might choose. I’m not sure which takes precedence – Featured Image or the Social tab, if you use both.

    • Thanks for the tip Mad! That will be helpful for anyone using Yoast. I can’t use it on this blog, as it’s hosted free with WordPress.com. But I’ve thought about using it with my clients. The only problem is that there are some reports that once you install Yoast that all previous SEO work you’ve done on your pages disappears and has to be redone. One of my accounts has thousands of pages that would be affected. So I’ve been hesitant to go that route until they are ready to embrace an entire site redo, which honestly they should probably pay someone else to do.

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