Category Archives: Yarn

Measure or Weigh? Which Do You Do With Your Yarn?


Do you measure or weigh your yarn?

Or neither?

The obvious reason to do either, is to be sure you have enough yarn for your project.

It’s fairly common for patterns to tell you up front how much yarn you need in terms of yards or meters. Some will also tell you how much yarn you need in terms of thickness and in actual weight.

When you buy yarn for your project, commercially produced yarn will state on the label how much yardage or meters and / or how much weight the yarn has. But even if it doesn’t show the weight, you can easily use a kitchen scale to weigh your yarn.

So what if you’re designing on your own? What if you don’t have a pattern, and you’re making something you’ve never made before?

You could measure length, but for speed, consider weighing your yarn.

How does that help you ask?

The weight of your yarn can be used as a means to gauge where you’re at in a project and how much more yarn you still need to finish it.

Say you’re a fairly experienced crocheter but you’re making your own hat design. You know what you’re doing, but you’re not entirely sure how much yarn you’re using to do what you want to do.

Weigh it. You can weigh both the UFO and the yarn you have left halfway through the project to help you gauge whether you have enough yarn weight left to finish it. If the finished portion weighs far more than the leftover yarn, then you’re probably going to run short on your project.  And if the yarn you have left weighs far more than your project does so far, then you’ll probably be ok.

You can also weigh your completely finished object so you know how much yarn to put down in your notes for the next time you make it.  Or for your pattern if you’re going to write and publish it.

Handy right?

Still, it seems that people have different opinions as to which method is more accurate. Weight or length?

So I put it out to you. Which method do you use? Share your answer in the comments below!

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Filed under crochet, Crochet Education, NaBloPoMo, Yarn

My Hack For A Yarn Slave, er… Feeder Stand Control Box Thing…


I had to kill some time today while getting my laptop looked over at a repair shop.  Seems my fan is about to go.  I thought it was flat-out dead at first, but it’s come back to life a little bit.  In its death throes for sure, but for now, zombie fan is spinning.

A ribbon storage box turned yarn slave.

A ribbon storage box.

So while I waited for the tech to look things over, I headed over to a nearby closeout store to look around.

I had hoped to find some bath sheets, but instead I found something (almost) better.  I found a promising crochet helper/enabler.

I found THIS!

It’s a “ribbon storage box” for ribbon spools – you know – for a wrapping paper station.

But I took one look at it and thought YARN.

Backstory

5 Ft Leaping Dear Tapestry - Aberrant Crochet

5′ Leaping Dear Tapestry

I use multiple yarns in almost all my projects.  It’s rare when I don’t.  Projects like my 5 Foot Leaping Deer Tapestry or my CLF Flaming Hook are extreme examples that required multiple balls of yarn to be attached and going in the same project in each row.

My Flaming Crochet Hook design for the CLF First Ever Book

Mostly because they were a mix of tapestry and faire isle techniques. (Read my Ravelry notes linked above.)

But even my simple projects like my version of my Grandma’s potholders use multiple yarns together and apart, depending on the look I want.

Potholders by Aberrant Crochet and Grandma

Potholders by Aberrant Crochet and Grandma

Wrangling all that yarn for a single project can get, well… “less than neat” shall we say.

So I’ve looked into ways to control the yarn I’m using.  For like ever.

I’ve used tall deep vases to keep yarn balls at bay.  I’ve used (clean) kitty litter buckets and 5 gallon Home Depot buckets.  I’ve used yarn bowls and soda bottles.  I’ve used decorative baskets and laundry baskets.  I’ve used special “made for yarn” project bags with little feeding holes and I’ve woven ends through the back slats of chairs to help keep yarns straight.

And aside from maybe the one large deep floor vase that was really heavy weighted that I used for a while until it broke, I wasn’t too satisfied with any of them.  Nice ideas, but in the long run just not enough help to justify the problems they brought to the table.

Friends have suggested I try things like this DIY Yarn Holder made from a toilet roll stand.  I just want to laugh, because if I can pull over a kitchen chair with what I do, a toilet paper stand that hasn’t been concreted into the ground hasn’t a chance. It might work for someone using just one lace weight yarn, or for a slower crocheter than I, but not for me.

I’ve had some thoughts on designing something, but haven’t had the time to give making something a try (yet).

Present Day

Yarn feeder stand hack - by Aberrant Crochet -2

A ribbon storage box turned yarn slave.

So today when I found the ribbon storage case, I saw opportunity.  Because this has spindles already to go.  This is a smooth painted box, ready to go.  And with just a look, I could tell that this would be perfectly sized for my cake balls (talking about yarn here for the uninitiated).  And with some modification, it might even work for my hand-wrapped balls too.

So I grabbed a couple cakes and voilà! I tested the spindles a bit.  They seem to hold. The box is sturdy and weighty.  Guess it might work!

Now to actually crochet on something to test this control box out…

The cherry on top?  It was $4 on clearance, at the closeout store.

Thanks yarn gods.

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Filed under Crochet Ruminations, NaBloPoMo, Yarn