Anarchy In Writing…


NaBloPoMo is the blogger’s answer to NanoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month). It stands for National Blog Posting Month. I refer to it sometimes as November NaBloPoMo, because after NaBloPoMo was taken over by BlogHer, it became used there as a monthly exercise throughout the year too. Bloggers could participate in a NaBloPoMo challenge any month, with a different theme to boot. However, the main traditional November Challenge was still supported and observed. And by far, it’s remained the most active time of the year for blogging challenges.

I mentioned to you yesterday that I would try to catch you up on the unofficial nature of official November NaBloPoMo this year. I don’t know much, but here’s what I do know.

It unfortunately appears that BlogHer.com may have forgotten or simply abandoned the annual project. My guess is this is related to their acquisition by SheKnows.com in 2014. No one from either identity is responding to inquiries about NaBloPoMo, which is disappointing. And a little confusing. I can find no official announcements about it one way or another either. The last couple years of “official” November NaBloPoMo coordination since the acquisition have seemed odd. Rumors of lots of changes at BlogHer were murmured. And last year November NaBloPoMo was definitely put together at the last minute.

However, this year, the entire site, login and everything is different. You can still find archives from previous years of NaBloPoMo, but there’s nothing new. You can find posts from bloggers asking about the challenge, and no responses. No responses on Twitter either. In fact, no real interaction at all. And the entire site has been redone and restructured. I even have a brand new writer’s page at SheKnows now, along with an invitation to be a social influencer. With no details.

I’m not sure what to make of it yet, but one thing is clear – they have not invested time or attention into NaBloPoMo this year. Which makes me yearn for days of yore when we were just a bunch of creative bloggers who wanted to make writing more approachable and fun. And we did it by teaming up in November to blog our hearts out, cheer each other on, and even donate drawings prizes for those who completed the challenge.

I joined BlogHer because of NaBloPoMo. But never really participated in any of the other challenges other than the November one. Old enthusiasm for a good thing dies hard. November is where it’s at.

I’m not alone. Seeing they didn’t start the annual event in the first place, people are self-organizing for this year’s challenge. Which is to write and publish a blog post every day for the month of November (no writing ahead or banking posts more than 24 hours ahead). At least, if you follow the original rules.  To learn more about NaBloPoMo, you can refer to my previous post on it here.

So… that’s the news. No one seems to be officially organizing NaBloPoMo for 2017. And who knows what kind of legalities surround any official organization, since BlogHer took over NaBloPoMo in 2011 when it became too big for the founder to run by herself.

Personally, I find this year’s abandonment sad, because the point is to help inspire writers (especially new writers) to take a dive and write. Or blog as it were. And find their sea legs in the exercise of crushing it with a daily deadline. Not to mention to help foster community. To me, it’s one of those worthy can’t-help-but-make-the-world-better exercises.

Does anyone legally own NaBloPoMo? Um, actually yes, a paper trail exists.

However, in exercise and concept, no one can prevent bloggers from keeping the November daily blogging tradition alive. Even if the free world ended and they took our internet away, I’m sure we could find a way to keep it going. Like some sort of cult. If we wanted. We could secretly meet every November at a retreat to share each other’s scripts. Maybe create some rights and rituals to make it really rebellious. Add chips, salsa and margaritas and I’m there.

So I suppose for now, there’s a little bit of NaBloPoMo anarchy about. Though two online entities I know of are sponsoring November blogging link up parties where you can share your posts. And I have joined them both for now.

NanoPoblano November 2017The group known as Nano Poblano is one that’s been around a little while. If you want to join their ranks as a Cheer Pepper and share November posts, that’s done in their Facebook Group. While I’ve been aware of their existence for awhile, I only just joined them this year.
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Blissfullemon NaBloPoMo Link Up PartyFor the 2017 challenge, Blissful Lemon has also offered a way to not only register your blog in one public place, but also share your November posts with fellow participants. After all, reading posts from others and supporting each other in the challenge is also part of the tradition.

Above are the respective badges for each group.

I’m glad these entities are providing a community for NaBloPoMo orphans around the world. And I did join them both this year.

But I’m feeling a little anarchist about it all. Like a sudden urge to find something to graffiti. My little tantrum over the NoMoNoBlo (No More November Blogging) that seems to have replaced such a nice community exercise.

As the world of internet blogging becomes more and more sleek, corporate and “official” and less individual and organic, I suppose it’s bound to happen.

If I had the bandwidth, I’d provide a rogue gathering spot myself. Though I’d be a poor leader for it this year with everything John and I just went through.

Still, creative rebel that I am, I couldn’t resist feeling like a message should be splattered somewhere. A little freedom of speech exercise. Mainly because no one has responded to queries. Like really, who does that? Or doesn’t do that, as it were. There’s so little interaction, it’s like the new site is run by robots.

Maybe “official” entities don’t care about NaBloPoMo anymore, or fail to see its value. Or maybe they tried to turn it into something else and failed to inform the masses who side with an annual November tradition.

But there’s a core of us out here who do care about a November Blogging Challenge and see its value. And we still love the creative individuality that was inherent in the original organic evolution of it. Maybe it’s a sign of the times and we’ll find ourselves having to move on.

But we were cool once.

NaBloPoMo #NoMoNoBlo 2017 Anarchy Badge - designed by Aberrant Crochet

And way back when, in the days of yore, many of us created and shared a variety of NaBloPoMo badges for people to pick from.

So I decided to get creative with a little rebel Aberrant protest of my own.

My expression of angst in a sea of other emotions I dine on these days.

Here’s the badge I created for this year.

#NoMoNoBlo anarchy begins.

 

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6 Comments

Filed under Editorial, NaBloPoMo, Writing

6 responses to “Anarchy In Writing…

  1. Thanks for all the information!

  2. Pingback: Day Five – NanoPoblano – Poem/Poetry – “Moonlit Miracles” by David Ellis | toofulltowrite (I've started so I'll finish)

  3. Hey, anarchy is in these days!

  4. I think it is very sad that there isn’t the support for this kind of thing with BlogHer any more. It is extremely difficult to get your content out to a wider audience and I guess everyone is looking at the bottom lines and if this type of thing is not raking in cash through advertising or other channels, then it is abandoned or neglected. I feel motivated to do the challenge because I want to read and share lots of new writers but also because I want to put myself in a position where I will have enough posts to make half a book and then make up the other half in April, that is my goal and I don’t require the help of any corporations to do that. I enjoy the sense of community that NanoPoblano provides and I will do my best to nurture and encourage the relationships with those who participate there. Also your badge is amazing, has a futuristic and earthy vibe to it all at once. Does the symbol in the light bulb have significance? I like it very much, it speaks to me on a lot of different levels 🙂

    • Thanks for your comments David. And for the feedback on my badge. It’s a bit of an art statement for me I guess. I did design it with purpose behind the parts. The light bulb is a logo symbol of my writing. It’s designed around a “filament” made from my crochet hook and pixie logos. My wings have always been a symbol of light and inspiration in creativity to me, so its presence inside the light bulb as part of the filament is apropos. I have designed a lot for cancer patients and terminally ill children. My goal is always that my creations bring joy and light where there may be pain. I try to create with the idea of infusing my stitches with all my prayers and good will for the future owner. The light bulb the light bulb in the badge represents illumination and freedom through cultivating and sharing ideas, i.e. the written and spoken word. Which of course, NaBloPoMo is all about. The splatter represents organic, playful creativity. NaBloPoMo was never about perfection, but rather about the commitment to writing and sharing that writing with the world. Regardless of our personal fears, hesitations or concepts of “good writing.” Or even “good ideas.” Green is a color for nurturing and healing, the same color as my design logo wings. The hashtag is used as a screen for the mouth, as the expression of creative individual ideas becomes less attractive compared to polished ideas of a collective. A commentary on when a/the collective says “Hush individual.” Or “There’s no value in individuality.” “No more questions, get back in line.” I personally believe we should strive for a yin/yang balance between the individual and the collective. And then of course, I prefer not to take opinions too, too seriously. There has to be some whimsy to the feel too. Ideas are best served for cultivating and stimulating enrichment of life and growth, not for oppression and not for tearing the innocent down. Anyway…. That’s the general idea without making it too serious. Thanks for asking. 🙂

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